CAN YOU PAY STAMP DUTY ON A CREDIT CARD | February 2024
Can You Pay Stamp Duty On A Credit Card?

February 2024

Can You Pay Stamp Duty On A Credit Card? In February 2024

This article will look at the question of whether you can pay stamp duty on a credit card in the UK. In addition, we will look at some related issues, like how much stamp duty you need to pay when buying property.

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What Is Stamp Duty Tax?

Stamp duty is the name given to a tax that’s paid on certain types of transactions – typically those involving property and financial instruments.

In the UK, stamp duty is levied by HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC).

Can I Pay Stamp Duty With A Credit Card?

Yes, you can pay your stamp duty bill on a credit card in the UK. This can be done with a personal credit card or a corporate credit card. Alternatively, you could just use a personal debit card.

This option is available to most individuals and businesses that are liable to pay stamp duty. The process of paying is relatively simple. 

However, you will need to provide your credit card details to your tax office or HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) when submitting the necessary forms for your stamp duty credit card payments.

It’s important to note that there may be additional charges for using a credit card for this purpose so make sure you check with your tax office before proceeding.

Additionally, if you choose to use a personal credit card, it’s also important that you are aware of any potential interest charges which may apply, as these could add up over time.

Can I Use A Loan To Pay Stamp Duty?

Yes, you can use a loan to pay stamp duty. Generally speaking, most lenders will allow you to borrow up to 80% of the cost of your property purchase, and this amount could also include any associated costs, such as stamp duty.

It’s important to understand that if you choose this route, then you may need to factor in additional borrowing costs, such as interest rates, when considering your budget for the purchase.

What Are The Stamp Duty Thresholds?

The SDLT was changed in 2022, and now there is a tiered system based on the purchase price.

If your purchase is below this level, no SDLT tax is applicable. But if it exceeds this amount, different rates apply depending on which category it falls into.

The tiered system is as follows:

– 0% for residential property and non-residential freehold land purchases up to a property value £250,000

– 5% with a property value between £250,001 and £925,000

– 10% between £925,001 and £1.5 million

– 12% on any amount above that.

You can use a stamp duty calculator to work out what you will need to pay.

What is a stamp duty surcharge?

A stamp duty surcharge is an additional tax which must be paid when purchasing certain types of property. This means that extra stamp duty is payable.

It applies to additional property, such as second homes and buy-to-let properties, as well as some other types of residential property.

The surcharge adds an extra 3% on top of the standard rate of stamp duty for these transactions in England and Northern Ireland (4% for purchases in Wales). 

This means that if you’re buying a second home or buy-to-let property, you will need to pay the higher rate.

It’s important to be aware of this additional charge before making any decisions about a purchase, as it could significantly impact your budget, as you may find that you end up paying extra fees and extra costs to complete the purchase.

stamp duty surcharge

When Do You Have To Pay Stamp Duty?

Stamp duty must be paid within 30 days of completion on a residential property or other chargeable transaction. If you are paying by credit card, then the payment will need to be made before the end of this period in order for it to be valid.

Failure to pay stamp duty on time could result in penalties and interest being applied so make sure that you understand when the payment is due and what actions need to be taken if you are unable to meet this deadline.

Stamp duty is the name given to a tax that's paid on certain types of transactions - typically those involving property and financial instruments.

What Is Stamp Duty Called In Different Parts Of The UK?

Stamp duty is also known as ‘SDLT’ (stamp duty land tax) and ‘LTT’ (land transaction tax) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, respectively.

Scotland operates a separate system of stamp duty known as the Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT).

Scotland’s LBTT System

LBTT is based on a tiered system, with different rates applying to different property values. The first £145,000 of a property’s value is exempt from the tax.

Scotland's LBTT System

Above this amount, a progressive rate of taxation applies, with higher thresholds and lower rates for residential properties than for non-residential properties.

The maximum chargeable amount for residential property transactions is £250,000 and the maximum chargeable amount for non-residential property transactions is £1 million.

In addition to the LBTT charged on purchases or acquisitions of land in Scotland, some other additional taxes may be applicable including:

  • Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT)
  • Additional Dwelling Supplement (ADS), which charges an extra 3% on top of any LBTT due when someone buys more than one home in Scotland
  • Landfill Tax, where landfill operators must pay tax on waste disposed of at a landfill site; and
  • Scottish Landfill Tax (SLfT), which charges an additional tax on materials sent to landfill.

The Scottish government is committed to ensuring that the taxation system remains fair and competitive while ensuring that revenue generated from LBTT is used to fund public services in Scotland.

The government will review the rates of LBTT each year and make any changes necessary to ensure they are appropriate for the economic climate. It also plans to introduce new exemptions or reduced rates in certain circumstances. 

Is Stamp Duty Paid On New Build Homes?

In the UK, stamp duty is usually paid on the purchase of a new build home.

The amount that must be paid varies depending on the value of the property and whether it’s a residential or non-residential property.

It’s important to note that first time buyers are exempt from stamp duty for homes worth up to £300,000 in England and Northern Ireland (and £500,00 in Wales), so if you’re a first-time buyer, you might be able to save significantly.

If you’re buying a new build property, it’s essential to ensure that you pay the right amount of stamp duty. If you don’t pay the correct amount, there are penalties, so it’s important to get advice from a professional before making any decisions about your purchase.

Stamp Duty Paid On New Build Homes

Is Stamp Duty Paid On Commercial Property?

In the UK, stamp duty is usually payable on the purchase of a commercial property.

The amount that must be paid depends on the value of the property and whether it’s a residential or non-residential property.

Generally speaking, most commercial properties are subject to higher rates of stamp duty than residential ones, so it’s important to get advice from an expert before buying any commercial property.

For example, if you are considering buying a warehouse or industrial unit for your business, you should be aware that there may be additional tax implications in terms of capital gains tax or corporation tax, depending on how the property is used.

Getting professional advice is essential to ensure you pay the correct amount of stamp duty.

In summary, stamp duty is generally payable on new build homes and commercial property purchases in the UK. 

It is important to ensure that you pay the right amount of stamp duty to avoid any penalties or additional tax liability. Professional advice should be sought for guidance on any potential implications prior to making a purchase.

How Can You Pay Stamp Duty?

Stamp Duty can be paid either in one lump sum or in instalments, depending on your particular circumstances. 

Most people opt to pay the entire amount upfront, but if you’re unable to do this, there are other options available.

The most common way of paying stamp duty is via a cheque or bank transfer directly from your bank account. 

You may also be able to pay using a credit card or debit card, although this may incur additional fees.

It’s important to keep all paperwork related to stamp duty payments as evidence that it has been paid correctly and on time. This includes receipts, any documents related to instalment payments and any correspondence with HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC).

Article author

Katy Davies

I am a keen reader and writer and have been helping to write and produce the legal content for the site since the launch.   I studied for a law degree at Manchester University and I use that theoretical experience, as well as my practical experience as a solicitor, to help produce legal content which I hope you find helpful.

Outside of work, I love the snow and am a keen snowboarder.  Most winters you will see me trying to get away for long weekends to the slopes in Switzerland or France.

Email – [email protected]

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Stamp Duty Tax?

Stamp duty is the name given to a tax that’s paid on certain types of transactions – typically those involving property and financial instruments.

In the UK, stamp duty is levied by HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC).

Can I Pay Stamp Duty With A Credit Card?

Yes, you can pay your stamp duty bill on a credit card in the UK. This can be done with a personal credit card or a corporate credit card. Alternatively, you could just use a personal debit card.

Can I Use A Loan To Pay Stamp Duty?

Yes, you can use a loan to pay stamp duty. Generally speaking, most lenders will allow you to borrow up to 80% of the cost of your property purchase, and this amount could also include any associated costs, such as stamp duty.

What is a stamp duty surcharge?

A stamp duty surcharge is an additional tax which must be paid when purchasing certain types of property. This means that extra stamp duty is payable.

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Disclaimer: Please be aware that this site is no longer under active management. As a result, we cannot assure the accuracy or relevance of the content provided. Visitors should use their discretion and consider the potential for outdated or inaccurate information before relying on any material found here.