What Is A Maisonette?

What Is A Maisonette?

This page was last updated on 1 May 2022

What Is A Maisonette In 2022?

What is a maisonette?

A maisonette (a french word) is a form of dwelling that comprises part of a house and part of a flat. Maisonettes are usually two stories tall and have their own front entrances on both levels, as well as internal staircases connecting the two levels.  Maisonettes are fashionable in the United Kingdom, particularly in metropolitan areas where space is limited.

They are also known as duplex flats or a duplex apartment.

They can be rented from private landlords or local authorities, and they frequently cost less than traditional homes or flats. Maisonettes vary in size but typically comprise one to three bedrooms, a living room, kitchen and bathroom. They may also have an additional loft space, which can be used for storage or as a bedroom.

Advantages of Maisonettes

There are several advantages to living in a maisonette.

1 – They are often more affordable than traditional homes or flats.

2 – They offer more space than traditional flats, which is particularly beneficial for families or couples.

3 – Maisonettes typically have their own front door and private outdoor space, which provides a separate dwelling and gives residents a sense of privacy and independence.

4 – Maisonettes often come with additional features such as loft spaces and extra bathrooms, which can be valuable for those who need extra storage or extra living space.

5 – Maisonettes have a lower population density than apartment buildings

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6 – Since maisonettes occupy only part of a home, you will be able to lead an independent lifestyle without unnecessary maintenance costs

7 – Since there are no direct connections to other homes in a multi-tenant building, the risk of damage from another resident is lower than it would be if you lived in a house or flat

8 – Some maisonettes have additional built-in storage space and can offer more value for money

9 – Maisonettes generally come with different layouts and overall designs, which means you will have more options when choosing your new home

10 – They are basically the same as having a two storey flat.

Disadvantages of Maisonettes

Whilst there are many advantages, there are also some disadvantages to consider.

1 – Although maisonettes grant residents a sense of independence and privacy, they can be difficult to maintain and less secure than traditional homes or flats.

2 – Homeowners must pay twice as much property tax on their maisonettes because each unit is taxed separately.

3 – Tenants of maisonettes often complain about a lack of repair service due to the difficulties involved with servicing multiple front entrances.

4 – Maisonettes are often perceived as less prestigious than traditional homes or apartments, so they may be harder to sell in the future.

5 – They are generally less energy-efficient than flats.

 

6 – If you live in a maisonette with a separate front door on each level, having visitors over might be difficult. Before making your purchase, you need to consider whether the additional area is worth the hassle.

7 – In multi-level buildings it can often be difficult to get insurance and mortgages. This is because the increased fire risk means that some insurers may not want to cover the property

8 – Since maisonettes are less common than other types of properties, they can be more expensive to purchase or rent

9 – If you are planning on renting a maisonette, it is important to remember that not all landlords will be familiar with the term. Make sure you clarify what you are looking for before signing any agreements

10 – During the winter, Maisonette homes may be tough to heat since the heat from one level does not always travel up to the following. If this is a problem for you, consider upgrading your heating system.

What is the difference between a maisonette and a house?

A maisonette is a type of dwelling that comprises part of a house and part of a flat. Maisonettes are usually two stories tall and have their own front private entrance on both levels, as well as internal staircases connecting the two levels

Maisonettes often come with additional features such as loft spaces and extra bathrooms, which can be valuable for those who need extra storage or extra living space.

In contrast, a house is an entire building designed to serve as a home or residence for one family. Houses generally have multiple floors, separate doorways and no direct connection to another house or apartment within the same building.

Maisonette

The main difference between a maisonette and a house is that a maisonette occupies two stories of a building, whilst a house typically occupies only one. Maisonettes also have their own front entrances and private outdoor space, which houses typically do not. Finally, maisonettes are less common than houses and are generally more expensive to rent or buy.

So, if you’re looking for extra space and want to be able to live independently, a maisonette could be the perfect option for you. However, it’s important to weigh up the pros and cons before making a decision.

A maisonette (a french word) is a form of dwelling that comprises part of a house and part of a flat.

Maisonette Vs house

Some people may see a maisonette house as being comparable to a house because they have more than one floor and their own front entrances. However, there is one significant difference between them: the fact that houses generally occupy only one building whereas maisonettes occupy part of two different buildings.

Because each floor has its own front entrance, this arrangement can make it difficult to maintain properties with multiple tenants. Homes also generally have additional features such as attics or basements which maisonettes do not typically include.

Maisonettes also appear in a high rise building, but nevertheless can still be seen as owning a little house in the housing block. 

Maisonette Vs apartment

Luxury flats, such as a maisonette apartment, may be found on two stories and are designed with comfort in mind. Luxury apartments, like maisonettes, can span two stories and are intended to provide comfort.

Apartments have a distinct style. They blend a one-of-a-kind design with a convenient location to create a living area that satisfies even the pickiest of clients’ expectations. Maisonettes are often less expensive than luxury flats. A lack of a communal entrance or communal area is what also appeals to people compared to a flat. 

what's a maisonette

In contrast, houses generally occupy only one building whereas these properties occupy part of two different buildings. This arrangement may make it difficult for landlords to maintain properties with multiple tenants since each individual tenant will have their own entrance and this could mean getting in each other’s way when entering or leaving the premises.

Like the above examples, paying ground rent is something you will also need to factor in.

Maisonette Vs Town House

A townhouse is another type of property found in some subdivisions, but it is very different from maisonettes.

Townhouses are usually two or three stories tall and stand-alone, meaning residents do not need to share their building with other tenants like they would in a maisonette. Townhouses also generally include more built-in storage space than apartments.

Townhouse owners must pay property tax on each unit individually; however, monthly fees for maintenance of the exterior (i.e., grass cutting) are often included in the monthly rent or mortgage payment for townhouses.

Maisonette Vs Penthouse

A penthouse is a type of luxury apartment that occupies the entire top story of a building. Penthouse apartments often have stunning views of the surrounding cityscape and come with a high price tag

Penthouses are different from a maisonette property in that they are typically much larger in size and include more luxurious features, such as private swimming pools and home cinemas. They are also less common than maisonettes, which are sometimes just viewed as a small house.

If you’re looking for extra space and want to live in luxury, then a penthouse might be the perfect option for you. However, it’s important to note that penthouses come with a correspondingly high price tag.

Are Maisonettes Freehold or Leasehold?

Maisonettes can be freehold, shared or leasehold.

The majority of maisonettes are leasehold properties. Maisonettes can be leased or freehold, depending on the situation. When looking to invest in a house, you should find out whether it’s leasehold or freehold before making an offer.

Freehold maisonette

If you purchase a freehold maisonette, you will own the property outright and will be responsible for all associated costs, such as repairs and maintenance.

If the maisonette is freehold, it might be held as an individual freeholder or a share of the freehold. This implies that the property and the grounds on which it is built are under the owner’s control. The owner of a freehold maisonette will be responsible for maintaining it.

Leasehold maisonette

The owner of a leasehold maisonette owns the building but not the land on which it is built. The lease allows property owners, known as the leaseholders, to use the property for a set period of time. Ground rent or service charge may also be required by the freeholder. Because there isn’t as much space spared, maisonette service fees are typically lower than those for flats.

Shared freehold maisonette

A shared freehold means that both the owner and the neighbour will own part of the freehold, implying they possess the property on which they are built. Because you’ll be responsible for both exterior upkeep and keeping an eye on one another’s properties, it’s a good idea to get along well.

In terms of the maintenance costs, this is often split between the lower and upper maisonettes. The owner of the lower property is typically responsible for the lower part of the building, including the ground floor and foundations. The owner of the upper property is usually responsible for the upper part of the building’s structure, such as the roof and guttering. However, there could be other plans in place.

Don’t forget, you will still need to pay ground rent.

What maintenance costs should I expect?

Typically, you could pay up to 1/3 of your maisonette’s overall exterior upkeep. For example, you may be responsible for clearing weeds or cutting the lawn. However, this will depend on the age and size of your home, as well as its layout. If you’re unsure about what you should be paying, speak to your local authority or use online calculators like this one.

flat maisonette

Are Maisonettes a Good Investment?

Maisonettes can be a good investment for a number of reasons.  These include:

– They are typically less expensive than full-sized houses, making them a more affordable option for first-time buyers. The cheaper price tag is certainly likely to be appealing.

– Maisonettes offer more space than apartments, making them an ideal choice for families or those who need extra and additional storage space.

– They are often located in desirable areas, close to amenities and transport links. They are often found in the town centre and can also offer access to a car park or off road parking, which can be valuable.

– As maisonettes are becoming increasingly popular, their value is likely to increase in the future.

If you’re thinking of investing in a maisonette, it’s important to do your research and consult with a property expert to find out which option would be best for you.

Maisonettes are a fantastic return on investment in certain regions, especially if you have the ability to increase the value of the property. Because maisonettes usually contain two floors, this means there may be loft space available on the property, which may be appealing to renters.

House converted into two maisonettes

A loft conversion or extension may be a good strategy to add value to your home. However, bear in mind that this will most likely require planning permission, depending on the work and local council requirements. If you want assistance or further information, contact the local planning authority.

flat maisonette

There are many advantages to purchasing maisonette flats as a property investment. These kinds of homes are frequently popular with young professionals, who make up a large proportion of the rental market. Maisonettes also tend to be more appealing to tenants than flats in terms of security, communal feel, and access to a private garden. Close to cities and in areas with a significant student population, these types of properties are most often found.

Maisonettes are becoming increasingly popular as a home for investment and residency, so they may have high resale value and appeal to renters. A maisonette can be a fantastic investment if you do your research. However, it’s just as important to conduct your due diligence, consider the facts, evaluate the advantages and disadvantages, and thoroughly investigate the area like you would with any other property purchase.

Are Maisonettes more affordable?

Maisonettes are often available at a lower price than house, because the property typically shares walls with another flat. This makes it more affordable to renters and buyers.

A maisonette is usually a more inexpensive alternative than buying a house. If you don’t mind having other people in your neighbourhood above or below, a maisonette may be the best option for you.

In conclusion

If you are looking for extra space and want to be able to live independently, a maisonette could be the perfect option for you. However, it’s important to weigh up the pros and cons before making a decision.

Some people may see a maisonette as being comparable to a house because they have two floors and their own front entrances.  They blend a one-o

Article author

James Lloyd

I am the primary writer and author for Help and Advice, having originally helped start the site because I recognised that there was a need for easy to read, free and comprehensive information on the web. I have been able to use my background in finance to produce a number of articles for the site, as well as develop the financial fitness assessment tool. This is a tool that provides you with practical advice on improving your personal financial health.

Outside of work I am a keen rugby player and used to play up to a semi-professional level before the years of injury finally took their toll.  Now you are more likely to see me in the clubhouse enjoying the game.

Email – james@helpandadvice.co.uk

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Frequently Asked Questions

Are Maisonettes more affordable?

Maisonettes are often available at a lower price than house, because the property typically shares walls with another flat.

What is a maisonette?

A maisonette (a french word) is a form of dwelling that comprises part of a house and part of a flat.

What is the difference between a maisonette and a house?

A maisonette is a type of dwelling that comprises part of a house and part of a flat. Maisonettes are usually two stories tall and have their own front private entrance on both levels

Are Maisonettes Freehold or Leasehold?

Maisonettes can be freehold, shared or leasehold.

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