What Illness Counts As Disability? | February 2024

What Illness Counts as Disability?

In the UK, a wide range of illnesses may be classified as a disability. The recognition of an illness as a disability can be crucial for accessing necessary support and protection. It's not just about physical conditions, mental health issues and progressive illnesses can also be considered.

In this article, you will learn:

  • Why understanding what illnesses count as a disability is essential, especially for those affected directly or indirectly.
  • How the UK defines disability, including the legal definitions and the types of illnesses that could qualify.
  • The factors that determine whether an illness counts as a disability.
  • The benefits available for individuals with disabilities in the UK and how to apply for them.
  • The challenges and misconceptions surrounding disability and the importance of overcoming them.
  • The support systems in place for people with disabilities and the actions you can take to ensure your rights or those of your loved ones are protected.

What Illness Counts as Disability?

In the UK, an illness counts as a disability if it has a long-term effect on the person's ability to carry out normal daily activities. This includes physical conditions, mental health conditions, and progressive conditions. The effect of the illness must be substantial and detrimental, and it must last, or be expected to last, at least 12 months.

Defining Disability in the UK

Under the Equality Act 2010, a person is considered disabled if they have a physical or mental impairment that has a long-term and substantial adverse effect on their ability to carry out everyday activities. The aim of this legislation is to ensure people with disabilities are not discriminated against and have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else.

The Equality Act and Disability

The Equality Act was designed to provide a legal framework to protect the rights of individuals and advance equality of opportunity. It recognises disabilities as being part of the UK's diversity and society. It prohibits unfair treatment in the workplace, when providing goods, facilities and services, when exercising public functions, in the disposal and management of premises, in education and by associations.

Types of Illness that Could Qualify as a Disability

Physical Health Conditions as Disabilities

Physical health conditions can count as a disability if they have a long-term effect on daily activities. This can include conditions such as arthritis, heart disease, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The key is the impact of the condition on the person's daily life.

Mental Health Conditions as Disabilities

Mental health conditions can also be considered as a disability. This includes conditions such as depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. Again, the focus is on the long-term effect of the condition on the person's ability to carry out normal daily activities.

Progressive Conditions and Disability

Progressive conditions are those that get worse over time. They can be considered as a disability once they start to have a significant impact on daily life. This includes conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and certain types of dementia.

Factors That Determine Disability Status

Impact of Illness on Day-to-Day Activities

The main factor in determining whether an illness counts as a disability is the effect it has on the person's ability to carry out normal daily activities. This includes things like using a computer, interacting with others, and getting around.

Length of Condition

Another factor is the length of time the person has had the condition. To count as a disability, the condition must have lasted, or be expected to last, at least 12 months.

Expected Progression of Illness

The expected progression of the illness is also considered. If the condition is likely to get worse and have an increasingly detrimental impact on the person's daily life, it may count as a disability.

Disability Benefits in the UK

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

The Personal Independence Payment is a benefit for people aged between 16 and state pension age who have a long-term health condition or disability. The amount you receive depends on how your condition affects you, not the condition itself.

Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for Children

The Disability Living Allowance is for children under the age of 16 who have difficulties walking or need more looking after than a child of the same age who doesn’t have a disability.

How to Apply for Disability Status

Required Medical Evidence

To apply for disability status and benefits, you will need to provide medical evidence of your condition. This could be a report from a doctor or specialist, or other health professional.

Application Process for Disability Benefits

The application process for disability benefits involves filling out a detailed form about how your condition affects you. It is important to provide as much detail as possible about the impact of your condition on your daily life.

Challenges and Misconceptions about Disability

Invisible Disabilities

Invisible disabilities are those that are not immediately apparent to others. This can include conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and some mental health conditions. These can be just as disabling as more visible conditions, but can be misunderstood or overlooked.

Overcoming Stigma and Misunderstanding

There can be a lot of stigma and misunderstanding around disability, especially for conditions that are not immediately visible. It's important to challenge these misconceptions and to work towards a more inclusive and understanding society.

Support for People with Disabilities

Support Groups and Charities

There are many support groups and charities in the UK that provide help and advice for people with disabilities. These can be a great source of information and support, and can also provide a sense of community.

Rights and Protections for Disabled Individuals

People with disabilities have certain rights and protections under UK law. This includes the right to reasonable adjustments in the workplace, the right to access goods and services, and protection against discrimination.

Practical Steps to Addressing Illness as Disability

When trying to understand what illness counts as a disability, it's crucial to take practical steps to manage the situation effectively. This article will guide you through a series of steps, from assessing the impact of the illness on daily life, to applying for benefits and seeking support.

Understand the Impact of the Illness

Understanding the impact of the illness on daily life is the first step in dealing with the illness as a disability. This involves identifying the ways in which the illness affects daily activities, and considering the long-term effects of the condition.

Consult a Healthcare Professional

Consulting a healthcare professional is an essential part of dealing with an illness as a disability. They can provide medical evidence of the condition, which is necessary when applying for disability status and benefits.

A key step in dealing with an illness as a disability is to research the legal definition of disability. Understanding how the law defines disability can help you to see whether your illness fits this definition.

Apply for Disability Status and Benefits

Once you have medical evidence of your condition, you can apply for disability status and benefits. The application process involves filling out a detailed form about how your condition affects you.

Seek Support from Charities and Support Groups

Seeking support from charities and support groups can be very helpful when dealing with an illness as a disability. They can provide advice, information, and a supportive community of people who are facing similar challenges.

Know Your Rights

Knowing your rights is a crucial step in dealing with an illness as a disability. People with disabilities have certain rights and protections under UK law, and it's important to understand these to ensure you are treated fairly.

Evaluating the Pros and Cons of Recognising an Illness as a Disability

Assessing an illness as a disability can be a complex process with various implications. This section seeks to outline some of the pros and cons of what illness counts as a disability, shedding light on the potential benefits and drawbacks.

Pros of Recognising an Illness as a Disability

Understanding what illness counts as disability can have several advantages. The following points explore seven of these potential benefits.

1) Access to Support

  • Recognising an illness as a disability can open up access to various support resources. These may include financial benefits, specialised medical care, and support from charities and organisations.
  • It can also provide access to disability aids and equipment, which can greatly improve the quality of life for individuals living with a disability.
  • In the UK, individuals recognised as having a disability are protected under the Equality Act 2010. This means they have legal protection against discrimination in various areas of life, including employment and education.
  • This protection can help ensure fair treatment and equal opportunities for individuals with a disability.

3) Increased Awareness

  • When an illness is recognised as a disability, it can increase awareness about the condition. This can lead to more understanding and empathy from others, helping to reduce stigma and discrimination.
  • Increased awareness can also lead to better research and treatment options for the condition.

4) Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

  • People recognised as having a disability can be eligible for the Personal Independence Payment (PIP). This is a benefit for people aged between 16 and state pension age who have long-term health conditions or disabilities.
  • PIP can help cover the extra costs of living with a disability, providing financial support and enabling more independence.

5) Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for Children

  • Recognising a child's illness as a disability can give them access to the Disability Living Allowance (DLA). This is a benefit for children under 16 who have difficulties walking or need more looking after than a child of the same age who doesn’t have a disability.
  • DLA can help provide financial support for families, easing the burden of extra costs associated with caring for a child with a disability.

6) Employment Support

  • Recognising an illness as a disability can make individuals eligible for employment support. This can include adjustments in the workplace to accommodate their needs or help finding suitable employment.
  • This support can help individuals with disabilities maintain their livelihoods and contribute to society.

7) Improved Quality of Life

  • Recognition of an illness as a disability can lead to improved quality of life. With the right support and adaptations, individuals can maintain independence and continue to participate in activities they enjoy.
  • This recognition can also lead to better mental health, as individuals feel validated and supported in their experiences.

Cons of Recognising an Illness as a Disability

Despite the pros, there are also potential drawbacks to recognising an illness as a disability. Below are seven points to consider.

1) Labeling and Stigma

  • Being labelled as disabled can lead to stigma and discrimination. Even with legal protections, individuals may face negative attitudes and barriers in various areas of life.
  • This stigma can affect mental health, adding to the challenges of living with a disability.

2) Misunderstanding and Lack of Awareness

  • Some disabilities, particularly invisible ones like mental health conditions or chronic illnesses, may be misunderstood. This can lead to lack of support and recognition, as the impacts of these conditions are not always apparent.
  • Misunderstanding can also lead to invalidation of the person's experiences and challenges.

3) Difficulty in Accessing Benefits

  • Even if an illness is recognised as a disability, accessing benefits can be difficult. The application process can be complicated and time-consuming, and not everyone who applies will be approved.
  • This can lead to delays in receiving much-needed support.

4) Variable Recognition of Disabilities

  • Not all illnesses are recognised as disabilities. This can leave individuals with certain conditions without the support and protections that come with a disability status.
  • This variability in recognition can lead to inequities in the support available to individuals with different conditions.

5) Impact on Self-Identity

  • Being labelled as disabled can impact a person's self-identity. Some people may struggle with this label and what it implies about their abilities and potential.
  • This can affect self-esteem and mental health, particularly if the person feels defined by their disability.

6) Cost of Care and Support

  • Even with financial benefits, the cost of care and support for a disability can be high. This can include the costs of medication, therapy, adaptations to the home or vehicle, and other necessities.
  • These costs can cause financial strain and stress.

7) Limited Work Opportunities

  • Despite legal protections, individuals with a disability may face barriers to employment. Some employers may have misconceptions about what a person with a disability can do, leading to fewer job opportunities.
  • This can limit the person's ability to earn a living and contribute to society.

Recent Surveys and Research on Illness and Disability

Recent research has shed light on the complex issue of what illness qualifies as disability. According to the Family Resources Survey 2018/2019 conducted by the UK government, there were 14.1 million people in the UK with a disability, representing about 21% of the population. The survey also noted that the most commonly-reported impairments were mobility (52%), stamina, breathing or fatigue (38%), and dexterity (28%).

A separate study published in the Lancet in 2019 looked at the global burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors. The research found that musculoskeletal disorders, mental health conditions, and neurological disorders were the leading causes of disability worldwide.

These statistics highlight the diverse range of illnesses that can count as disability and underline the importance of understanding and recognising disability in its many forms. With ongoing research and surveys, we can continue to build on our understanding of disabilities and how to best support those affected.

A Case Study on Dealing with Illness as Disability

To illustrate the concept of "What illness counts as disability?" in a real-world context, let's consider the case of Jane. Jane is a 45-year-old woman living in Birmingham, UK, who has been dealing with a serious illness that has significantly impacted her daily life.

Jane was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) five years ago. MS is a condition that can affect the brain and spinal cord, causing a wide range of potential symptoms, including problems with vision, arm or leg movement, sensation, or balance.

Recognising her illness as a disability was a crucial first step for Jane. It enabled her to understand the legal protections in place for her under the Equality Act 2010, such as protection from discrimination in the workplace. It also opened up the potential for financial support through Personal Independence Payment (PIP).

With professional medical advice, Jane was able to provide the necessary medical evidence of her condition and apply for PIP. Though the process was lengthy and at times challenging, Jane was approved for PIP, which has helped cover the extra costs related to her condition.

Jane's case underscores the importance of recognising an illness as a disability. It shows the potential benefits, from financial support to legal protections. It also highlights the challenges involved, such as the complexity of the application process and the impact of the condition on her daily life.

Key Takeaways and Learnings

As we conclude this article, let's summarise the key aspects of what illness counts as a disability.

  • Disability is not confined to physical conditions; mental health and progressive illnesses can also qualify.
  • The Equality Act 2010 provides the legal definition of disability in the UK and protects individuals with disabilities from discrimination.
  • The impact of an illness on daily life, the length of the condition, and its expected progression are key factors in determining disability status.
  • Disability benefits such as Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for children are available in the UK.
  • Applying for disability status and benefits requires medical evidence and involves a detailed application process.
  • Invisible disabilities and stigma are challenges in recognising and understanding disability.
  • Support groups and charities can provide valuable help for individuals with disabilities.

In summarising this discussion on "What illness counts as disability?", it's clear that recognising an illness as a disability involves understanding the law, knowing one's rights, and being aware of the support available. It's a complex topic with various implications and challenges. But with the right information and support, individuals can navigate this process and access the help they need. This understanding can also foster empathy and awareness in society as a whole, contributing to a more inclusive and understanding environment for all.

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Disclaimer: Please be aware that this site is no longer under active management. As a result, we cannot assure the accuracy or relevance of the content provided. Visitors should use their discretion and consider the potential for outdated or inaccurate information before relying on any material found here.